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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
to stimulate the economy is hire more teachers. well, the answer to that is, of course they would say that, they are teachers. i think the best thing to stimulate the economy is to hire more conservative journalist. [laughter] >> i think it is just self-evident that that would work. [laughter] >> that is logic to consider that it rejects other forms of federal spending. there is also a form of keynesianism that sweeps into conservative economic thinking once you get into defense spending. they begin to talk about the loss of jobs at the close on a military base and the multipliers that we have is the hairdresser who, you know, is cutting the true terror won't have a job that point. that may come on some level be true. i could be argued with every program. with other programs we look in terms of how that money could otherwise be spent and who might otherwise be employed and what other economic opportunities are lost as a result of the government spending. but when it is defense spending, conservatives have a bit of a blind spot with that. the purpose of national defense is defending the nat
-cents, joining us now to analyze what is going on with the economy. these markets, arthur lapre it is great to have you with us. >> thank you, lou. lou: start with impact of the hurricane. to whether much is made too much made, of the impact on gdp growth or broad economy for next several months. >> it is just a temporary hit, i would expect from the storm. i don't think it will be long lasting or affect gdp growth. it will not affect the ream economy over -- real economy over any long run. lou: our hearts go out to those who suffered so much damage and devastation, and losses. and those who lost loved ones. this is a very tough time, and it is almost impossible to judge what the impact will be, psychically on the nation. andn terms of the politics. give us your best assessment there. >> well, i don't think it will have much of an affect on politics, both candidates handled themselves well. president oba of presidential, and did these duties correctly. i don't think that mitt romney any anything wrong. he was very respectful of the storm and respectful of the people. i think the
that will pull us together. also with the economy which is another big sticking point. we are supposed to have constitutionly -- the congress is supposed to take care of our monetary policy but since we shrugged that off to another entity and it's not doing a good job of it. these are the things i want to get back to doing as a congressman if you will elect me, we will see a lot -- we will see things happen differently in this country. >> let's get to some of the questions, one thing people are wondering about is the economy. 16 trillon dollars in debt. unemployment at 8%, housing market is a mess. what would do you? >> you have to face it by addressing monetary policy. this is something that congress ignores even though we try to fix small things here and there. we are going to mess with this housinmarket, just try to -- increase jobs over here through the government expansion of some sort of program or another. the real thing that boils down is the economy is where the money comes and what it's made of. the fact we have a federal reserve that's about to again do another round of easing, th
than just a week ago. so like the economy, this election seems to be heading in the right direction. now we have got the get the word from the ground. so joining us is brian moran. he is coming to us from washington, d.c. virginia went blue last election, and chairman moran is trying to keep that it way. brian welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you very much. and might i say to you, thank you so much for joining us in the commonwealth and virginia democrats would love to have you return as soon as possible. >> jennifer: well, thank you. when i was there two weekends ago there was a lot of great energy with these polls that have come out since being a bit of a mixed bag. i'm wondering if you can tell our viewers what is the vealing on the ground? >> it continues to be very exciting. just to follow up on your presentation. all along we have felt confident in virginia because of the grown game. we have a superior ground game. it is the largest we have ever seen in virginia history. it actually surpasses that in 2008. so we feel real good. we are located in every r
reporter will talk about the economy in swing states and how it affects campaign 2012. we will take a look at the role religion is playing in the campaign 2012 and how the latest voted blocks might impact the election. turn your clocks back one hour tonight. that is it for "washington journal." a new edition comes at 7:00 tomorrow morning. >> through the election day, what our coverage of the presidential candidates and key senate and house and governor races. after an overview of the 2012 senate races, we will show you the maine senate race debate. >> a senior analyst for the rothenberg her campaign has completely retooled. she reinvents herself. she has had some good television ads. murphy is making up the advantage where it needs to be. she is open a case like, but not a huge leak that democrats would like in connecticut. -- lee that democrats would like in connecticut -- lead that democrats would like in connecticut. north dakota is an interesting one. it is one that if democrats have not gotten the right candidate, we would not be talking about it being as competitive. the democrat ge
the impact on our economy. and on transportation. you know, the election will take care of itself next week. >> and here is what governor romney said. >> on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times. >> and our hearts and our prayers go to them as we think about how tough it is going to be there. i don't think there has been a hurricane in ohio in a long time. but there have been some hurricanes that have caused a lot of damage across this country and hurt a lot of families and their families are in harm's ways that will be hurt either in their possessions or perhaps even something more severe. >> we have faced these kind of challenges before and as we have, it is good to see how americans come together and this looks le another time when we need to come together, all across the country, even here in ohio and make sure we give of our support of the people who need it. >> rose: several national polls have the president and governor romney in a virtual dead heat coming down the stretch, some others have different results when you look at the swing
not quite as optimistic about where the economy is at and out of the market. and so, their own individual participation has been declining. and i don't know if that's necessarily telegraphed some problems down the road, but what do you think? >> well, i think we're living through a lot of uncertainty in the market, whether it's europe, whether it's the direction, the direction of the u.s. economy and the federal debt. and all of those things are certainly weighing on the retail investor's mind and definitely they're been moving to conservative position, as have been this, they've been protecting liquidity and building their positions and fairly risk averse, now, hopefully i'm cautiously optimistic on the u.s. economy that once they get through this election, regardless of who wins, our leaders in washington come together and develop a plan to deal with our fiscal challenges. >> well, springs eternal, we'll see, i was saying teddy, teddy weisberg, teddy was here the last time we had a two day disruption in 1888 and now, must be living history all over again. teddy. how do you think it's go
, you heard that it is likely going to hits our economy, hard, maybe shave upwards of a half% off our economic growth in the latest quarter, it will likely dampen christmas shaping enthusiasm, hit consumer confidence, and likely shopping in general. so much we don't know. this much we do -- just getting back to anything approaching work in big apple, will be tough. very tough. and it all begins with wall street's hope of getting back to business tomorrow morning. jamie colby, down by by battery tunnel that will be the point of entry to many who want to return but will not be able to use that point, jamie? >> reporter: without a duty, i know one person would be happen markets are open tomorrow, this is charlie gasparino, i saw you and see discuss it earlier about the fact it had to close. but it is not only thing that closed. let me show you how sporadic thing are. ritz-carlton, no lights, next door, an apartment building, full of electricity. i walked streets of lower manhattan today trying to find a single business that was cleaning up. but without power, so many had to day home, add
to grow this economy, and i would appreciate your vote. >> moderator: steve woods? woods: i'm a businessman and chairman of my local town council. this campaign and other campaigns bother me. cynthia, i am tired of your constant criticism of old wealthy white men. i think it is undignified for a u.s. senate candidate. charlie, i'm tired of your gross distortion of truth in regard to angus king come and i'm tired of your tv commercials ruining all my favorite shows on abc. i get it. 1.3 million. we both think that angus is responsible for terrible things. that and everything else. but as a citizen of maine, i ask you stop this for the next hour. i would like to talk about the issues. i pledge to give to check for $5000 each to the main surety of your choice. this is an opportunity to prove that you put maine verse. >> moderator: not know about our candidates, we're going to move into her questions. there are a lot of issues. again, you're free to submit a question of your own that are website or facebook or twitter. one in five americans approve of the job that the congress i
to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in history after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours into other parts of new york and new jersey. >> a lot of people are here. a lot of people are hurting. so, it's upsetting. >> reporter: power is out. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and dozens of streets are impassable. still, the city is planning to go ahead with its annual marathon, which kicks off on staten island's verrazano bridge
to deal with the economy. jenna. jenna: keep an eye what is happening in florida and rest of breaking news in politics and otherwise. carl, thank you. jon: the weather has affected election and campaigning plans and hundreds of miles from the eye of the storm, sandy's violent outer bands prompted weather warnings. they kicked up massive waves. this is the no the ocean. these are the great lakes. how much damage did the storm do there? we'll speak to the commander of michigan's emergency management office coming up. >>> startling new numbers out of europe. what the unemployment rate says about the recovery there, and the chances europe could be headed toward another recession. [shouting] many of my patients still clean their dentures with toothpaste. but they have to use special care in keeping the denture clean. dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident is designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula sing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than brush
to the economy is sort of a muddle. that the way he loses is if the unemployment rate remains high, jobs -- the jobs are not -- are 75,000, 80,000 jobs created no talking point where he can say it's not where we want it to be but i think it's getting better, so i think a muddle -- it's sort of the tie goes to the incumbent. in baseball, be it's muddled enough it winds up not helping mitt romney which means it helps barack obama a little bit. >> let me ask you, charlie, just switching gears for a second, unless you disagree with chris cizilla, i wanted to ask you about the house and the senate. because if president obama were to win then perhaps he could pull a couple of those close senate races in, the house we pretty much all agree is going to stay republican, but one of the things we've been looking at more closely is that this is going to be a more partisan and less experienced house of representatives. >> exactly. our model this morning had democrats picking up three or four seats total and they need 25. you're absolutely right, that the people that are leaving congress, whether they
what really is going on here. when president clinton said the economy is stupid, what really happened all the way back in 1980, we went through a 24 hours news cycle which you represent first-hand, the ability of the press to cover news has been enhanced. job reports, gdp reports, prior to 1980, with the advent of cnn and later yourselves, they got pushed aside. they were only covered in print. this will be decided in the middle west, on the jobs numbers, the gdp numbers, it will be decided in some of these swing states. dagen: does it make, speaking of swing states, the cincinnati -- that one pull from the cincinnati inquirer has them neck and neck 49-49. because of the weather, because they are canceling some events, do those ad dollars spent on tv in the ads that are running on radio and television, are they even more critical because of what is happening with the weather? >> it has been a tsunami of ads. it is just overwhelming. there is almost nothing you can do in this letter week that you have not already seen. all the tv time was bought up as early as labor day. i think friday
of the debates on topics. do you like the format, one is for foreign affairs, one for the economy? >> in an ideal situation, the president deals of great deal with foreign policy, domestic policy, it makes sense to make sure you will not be so heavily weighted one way or another. for example, in the 2004 election, iraq was a huge issue. that might have been a time where the candidates would want to spend a lot more time on foreign policy. right now, most voters say the primary concern is the economy. so, i think maybe there needs to be a little more flexibility in combat. -- on that. i know candy was thinking about that -- on that. i know can be was thinking about that. >> they are given three debates. we did go back and look at what was covered thoroughly. one of them was education, and at one point the president but did meehan said -- looked at me and said we have not discussed education at all, and i said in my head, sorry, he spent the first 20 minutes of the first debate talking about education. we knew -- remember, the first questions all came from the town hall, so i could not just come of
these conservative economies, liberal economists you can look everything to find people to say you need an balanced approach thank colludes tax increases and cuts in spending, but fortunately you have a group of people in washington and mitt romney who have forsaken their oath to the constitution in favor of a blood oath they signed for grover norquist. >> jennifer: and charlie i want to make sure the senate remains in democratic hands. you are in a key state, you have written about elizabeth warren and scott brown give us a quick update. >> she has a small working margin right now in most polls. she is going to have to run the race all the way to the wire though. he has parts of the state where he is still very popular. he had three things going for him, and one of the biggest things was that people liked him. he is running a very unlikable campaign. and he has committed unforced error after unforced error, and just said we discover the national right to life committee funneled $45,000 into his campaign. >> jennifer: wow. >> i think she is in good shape, but she
and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country that if in the absence of its wealth and its willingness to spend that wealth on engineering the seas to keep low lands occupied by dutch people, it wouldn't be a viable country. the question for t ited states is because we are a coastal country with, as one of the other guests said 4 million people at least at high tide never mind back up a bit to account for three feet of higher seas in 30 or 40 years. this is not a problem that can be solved by engineering alone. not on a national scale. manhattan could solve it by engineering is alone, at least for half a century but the whole count c. e question is really from a policy perspective, from a taxpayer's perspective, trying to break the cycle of, i think p
and new jersey. new estimate says sandy will cause $50 billion in damage to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed like toys. that continues throughout the neighborho neighborhood. many residents say they feel ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten burrough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we're going to die! we're going to freeze! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claiming their community has been ignored in the days following sandy while aid pours in to other parts of new york and new jersey. >> they don't talk abo
that economy is booming so fast that no one can control it anymore. for me the ahasing thing is that i can say that in relation to "silent house" is that i've been living for 60 years. there've vn times that i've come back this or that that the change i sa in th first 45 years less than the change i saw in the last 15 years. >> wow. how is it different? change in the last 15? is it just velocity? >> velocity. immense economical -- political change is more development of say -- development of free speech and liberal society and because of economics and it's hard to control turkey anyre. it's s ri and coming that it's hard to crush it down and control it. >> rose: as i a writer do you -- and because of the run in you had you were criticized for criticizing turkey, correct? >> yes. >> rose: they arrested you. >> no. >> rose: well, they didn't arrest you but -- >> i was fined but then it was dropped because of international pressure. >> rose: exactly. i understand that. do you fear at all now what you have to be careful that you make sure what you say is understood for what you mean? >> these are
particularly his handling of his economy, the economy is not doing very well, you can't criticize him on this. this is something that needs to be done. why is it important for markets to be open? well, guess what? we don't know what the value of corporate america is -- if we don't know what the value of corporate america is, that's a problem. we don't know how much ibm is worth because the markets are closed. that's how you judge the value of these companies by what their stock is trading on. without an active stock market, you can't sell ipos. you can't do a secondary offering of stock. you can't finance yourself. the business of capitalism stops. why was it stopped for two days? now, obviously, you know, if we're going to an emergency contingency plan, there's a chance it might not work as great, but it is better than nothing. could they have opened it up a little bit? you know for a couple of hours? liz: or at least the traders that could get in. >> forget about traders getting in, i would say this, why doesn't every wall street firm have a contingency plan where they don't have to send pe
a v8. woooo! the economy needs manufacturing. machines, tools, people making stuff. companies have to invest in making things. infrastructure, construction, production. we need it now more than ever. chevron's putting more than $8 billion dollars back in the u.s. economy this year. in pipes, cement, steel, jobs, energy. we need to get the wheels turning. i'm proud of that. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ >> osgood: now a look at halloween by the numbers. a record 170 million people in this country say they plan to celebrate halloween this year according to a national retail federation survey. total halloween spending is projected to hit $8 billion. the average halloween consumer spending nearly $80, up from last year. more than 93% of children go trick or treating according to the national confectioners association. 63% of trick or treaters say chocolate is their favorite treat. followed by 9% favoring lollipops, 7% gummy candy, and 7% for those who favor bubble gum or chewing gum. as for the adults who hand out the treats, 41% confess that they
to was economy university. i did it for a year. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)